Archive for the ‘Dissecting Room’ Category

Memory Serves

June 14, 2018

“Memory Serves”

E.J. Wagner

One cold gray March day back in the 80’s, I made my usual trip to Manhattan to meet my pathologist cousin Teddy, to share lunch and discuss murder.

We were both late, having each walked past the restaurant, in spite of having met at the same spot for months.

He blames our mutual lack of directional sense on genetic inheritance -jovially reminding me that our grandparents were cousins.

(Our grandparents had died years before I was born, but Teddy, 27 years my senior, has happily shared details of their eccentricities)

“Cousins? Did matchmakers allow sort of thing?”

“Matchmakers had nothing to do with it. They arranged it themselves-a true love match. They remained a very romantic, demonstrative couple all their lives. The family would tease them. She never called him ‘Lev’ which was his name-it was always ‘Mein Lieb ’.”

Due to the age gap between us and the fact that he had spent years in France, India, China and Burma working for the OSS, I didn’t get to know Teddy until I was an adult.

When I needed information on autopsy techniques for a Museum presentation ay Stony Brook University, I phoned him. He invited me to the medical examiner’s office to observe.

I watched, fascinated, as this soft spoken, gently humorous man neatly sliced a human liver and dropped the bits into what seemed to be a take out food container.

Intrigued, I became a frequent visitor to the Office.

Over time, Teddy became my mentor.

During our lunches, he convinced me that with his help I could write a valuable book on the history of forensic science.

“And it’s important to do-“ he’d tell me “if we don’t learn from the mistakes of the past we’ll repeat them”.

So I was shaken when he leaned across the table that March day and said-

“about the book-we’ll have to find someone else to mentor you. I’ve developed some neurological issues-memory gaps- definitely getting worse. I’ll help as long as I can-here’s a reading list..

(I notice it’s an inch thick and single spaced)

He describes the sort of forensic specialist I need to work with-who sounds like a mash up of Albert Schweitzer, Sherlock Holmes, and a particularly well disposed Saint Bernard.

“I’ll give you my notes-you can serve as my memory” he finished.

Teddy had presented a perfectly succinct well organized plan.

Sure he was suffering a case of mistaken self diagnosis, I was trying to say this tactfully when he suddenly demanded ;

“Our grandparents-did you know they were cousins? First cousins? She used to call him… what did she call him? What was it? I can’t remember!!”

“She called Mein Lieb” I told him.

The End

Author’s Day Setauket NY

April 21, 2018

Sunday May 6th I’ll be in Setauket at Emma S. Clark Library at reception for local authors. All welcome-no charge-light refreshments. Come and say hello-starts at 1:30
I won’t be selling my books , although Ill be happy to sign any you bring.

I’m in the Cloud

April 3, 2018

After endless problems with email, I have a new address
I may be found float at
EJcrimehistory@Icloud.com

Sherlock Holmes Book Mystery Solved

January 19, 2018

Kind folks have  been asking why they cannot find the Fall River Press (subsidiary of Barnes and Noble) 2016 edition of my book “The Science of Sherlock Holmes; from Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear,The Real Forensics Behind the Great Detectives Greatest Cases”

I diligently investigated the matter and my editor at Fall River has divulged the answer.

The Fall River edition has been SOLD OUT !  Yea! A few copies might still be at scattered  B&N shops but I have no list. A decision has not yet been made as to printing more.

The original edition , however, is readily available thru the usual suspects- Turner Publishing, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, etc.

EJW

 

 

 

Interview re Sherlock Holmes

October 7, 2017

This is an interview I did (in English) for an  from an Austrian radio program.

Mr Holmes is celebrated everywhere!

The Science Behind the Sherlock Holmes’ Novels

The famous detective novel series with Sherlock Holmes as the main investigator is 125 years old. FM4’s Reality Check asks: What have the novels done for a scientific approach to crime solving and forensics?

By Steve Crilley

Arthur Conan Doyle created the detective in 1887 while living on the south coast of England and working as a doctor. He turned to writing due to low patient numbers in his surgery. Through books, films and now the latest BBC television series, staring Benedict Cumberbath, the famous detective still fascinates audiences in 2017.

Here is our Reality Check Special, In the Shadow of Sherlock” as heard on Saturday 7th October at 12 midday, where we took a plunge into the world of the infamous gentleman detective who (in fiction) lived at 221B Baker Street, London.

Hear an interview with E. J. Wagner, click on
12:14 The Science of Sherlock Holmes  here.

As part of our celebration of 125 years of Sherlock Holmes stories, I spoke with crime-historian and storyteller E. J. Wagner, author of a book of scientific entertainment entitled The Science of Sherlock Holmes

Steve Crilley: E.J., can you take us back to the 1880s, Victorian London. Forensics was in its infancy and I guess the London police didn’t have much time for clever science, when there were murderers out there to catch?

E. J. Wagner: Well, that’s absolutely true. In fact, there was no scientific approach to crime solving in those days at all. What we think of now as forensic science grew out of a field known as medical jurisprudence. It was sort of a footnote to gynaecology. The first cases, that were examined were stillbirths and obstetricians were very concerned about whether or not the child did or did not breathe when they were born. Was there a possibility that a case was infanticide? And it was out of examining these foetuses, that we began to take notes on what happens to a body which doesn’t function and which is dead. The other big input was dissection of criminals, where bodies of the executed were examined and given over to the scientific community to study. So it was out of these dual professions obstetrics and executioners that the idea of dissection to determine the cause of death first came about.

In the 1880s Sir Arthur Conan Doyle studied medicine at university in Edinburgh. I guess this was a time, when bodies were been dissected and discussed in classes – without much regard for medical ethics and how the bodies ended up in a medical class in the first place.

Well there had been an anatomy act which allowed bodies to be given over if they had been executed criminals. Previously there had been an enormous scandal about bodies being stolen from graves and handed over to medical students. There was a great deal of revulsion from the community towards this. Asa a result, there was an Anatomy Act where there was a legal method of donating bodies or having bodies given by the state over to medical practitioners.

Johnny Bliss /Sherloqd
johnny_sherlockd.5664303FM4 Reporter Johnny Bliss (left) went to a Sherlock Holmes experience Sherlocked – the Escape Game“ in Vienna’s 14th district.

One of the gifts of Sherlock Holmes was to say to the world of the day: superstition plays little part in a gruesome crime. Forget vampires – a person really did it!

Well, that was Sherlock Holmes’s position absolutely! He said “We have no time for vampires here”. And he believed in an absolutely objective scientific approach. He kept on talking about his method. But what his method really was, was a combination of careful observation, and the application of what we now know as the scientific method: you observe certain facts and from them you draw a hypothesis. Then, if you can prove that hypothesis a number of times, now you have a theory. Now, a theory in science is not just some stray idea that flicked through your brain. A theory has got a lot of science behind it. The thing is, you must almost always need to be ready to change your mind as new facts become available. It’s a flexible thing!

What is your favourite example of how Holmes solved case through his use of forensics?

I think one of my favourites is the Hound of the Baskervilles, because he was really taking a piece of folklore, which is very evocative; the moors and the sounds and the glooming darkness. And he simply applies logic to the case and says: It is not possible. So, if it is not possible, once you have removed what is not possible, whatever remains must be the truth.

Really Good Book on Bad Psychology

September 9, 2017

Bad Psychology
How Forensic Psychology Left Science Behind
Robert A. Forde

Robert A. Forde challenges widely held yet flawed views in the field of applying psychology to criminality. Here, he exposes the lack of evidence behind current policy.
For decades the psychological assessment and treatment of offenders has run on invalid and untested programmes. Robert A. Forde exposes the current ineffectiveness of forensic psychology that has for too long been maintained by individual and commercial vested interests, resulting in dangerous prisoners being released on parole, and low risk prisoners being denied it, wasting enormous amounts of public money. Challenging entrenched ideas about the field of psychology as a whole, and how it should be practised in the criminal justice system, the author shows how effective changes can be made for more just decisions, and the better rehabilitation of offenders into society, while significantly reducing the cost to the taxpayer.

This is a fearless account calling for a return to scientific evidence in the troubled field of forensic psychology.

Reviews
‘A riveting, sharply written examination of the fault line between good science and forensic folklore.’
– E.J. Wagner-author of the Edgar-winning The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the Real Forensics Behind the Great Detective’s Greatest Cases

‘Bad Psychology is a must and timely book for anyone interested in forensic evaluation and the (mis)-use of science. It is a wake-up call to bring science to the work of forensic examiners.’
– Dr. Itiel Dror, Cognitive Neuroscientist, University College London

“A Leg to Stand On; the Law and the Sign of Four”

August 10, 2017

Michael B. Miller, member of the Norwegian Explorers Scion in Minnesota, and frequent perpetrator of Groaner Quizzes, made adroit use of a Sherlockian reference in his role as  Sr Assistant Hennepin County Attorney.

MIke Miller_1a7e   Photo by Jean Upton

Brief

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT

DISTRICT OF MINNESOTA

HENNEPIN COUNTY defendants’ REPLY BRIEF

Civil No. 06-4953 JNE/SRN

Baribeau; Jamie Jones; Kate Kibby,

on Jessicaher own behalf and as guardian for

her minor brother Kyle Kibby; Raphi Rechitsky;

Jake Sternberg; and Christian Utne,

Plaintiffs,

vs.

City of Minneapolis, Inspector Jane Harteau,

Sgt. Tim Hoeppner, Sgt. E.T. Nelson,

Sgt. John Billington, Sgt. D. Pommerenke,

Sgt. Erica Christensen, Officer Tim Merkel,

Officer Roderic Weber, Officer Sherry Appledorn,

Officer Jeanine Brudenell, Officer Robert Greer,

Officer Jane Roe (whose true name is unknown),

officer John Doe (whose true name is unknown,

and

County of Hennepin, Sean Kennedy,

Becky Novotny, Sam Smith (whose true name

is unknown, and Officer Mary Jones (whose true name is unknown,

Defendants.

INTRODUCTION

Plaintiff Jake Sternberg (Sternberg)¹ has filed and served a memorandum in opposition to the Hennepin County defendants’ summary judgment motion.  Essentially, Sternberg attempts to create one or more issues of material fact and to rebut the legal defenses asserted by these defendants.

Plaintiff’s memorandum does neither.  The factual disputes he raises do not rise to the level of materiality; he fails to make a prima facie case on any of the claims pleaded in the complaint; and he fails to provide the legal analysis necessary to rebut the affirmative defenses raised by defendant.  (more…)

“Science of Sherlock Holmes”new updated edition!

February 21, 2017

Fall River Press  has published a new,updated edition with new chapter  of “The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear, the Real Forensics Behind the Great Detective’s Greatest Cases… by E.J. Wagner
Average rating 4.5

B&N Cover.jpg

available at Barnes and Noble

This new, updated edition of the Edgar® Award-winning The Science of Sherlock Holmes is as fascinating and eye-opening as any Holmes mystery.  

IT CONTAINS  NEW CHAPTER ,  ” THE  EXCESSIVELY EXPRESSIVE CORPSE IN THE CANON “
“Fascinating.” –The Christian Science Monitor
“A double triumph…masterful.” –The Toronto Star
“Utterly compelling.”–Otto Penzler
Take a wild ride by hansom cab along the road paved by Sherlock Holmes—a ride that leads you through medicine, law, pathology, toxicology, anatomy, blood chemistry, and the emergence of forensic science during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Author E.J. Wagner delves into gripping real-life mysteries such as:

How Jack the Ripper’s brutal 1888 murders could have been solved, if detectives had followed the example of the Holmes mystery A Study in Scarlet, published the year before.

How a clever detective proved the butler did it.

Dr. Watson - registered as Wagners' The Game's Afoot - photo by W.R.Wagner

Dr. Watson – registered as Wagners’ The Game’s Afoot – photo by W.R.Wagner

How early forensic science failed in the Lizzie Borden Case

How  Black Dog  ghost tales   are linked to haunting murder case
In examining the Great Detective’s remarkable adventures—along with gripping real-life mysteries such as the disappearance of Dr. George Parkman, wife-killer Kenneth Barlow, Jack the Ripper, and Lizzie Borden—Wagner gives readers a new perspective on both Holmes and modern-day forensic detection.

ISBN-13:
9781435163980
Publisher:
Fall River Press
Publication date:
02/03/2017
Pages:
264

Meet the Author

E.J. Wagner is a crime historian, lecturer, teller of suspense stories for adults, and moderator of the annual Forensic Forum at Stony Brook University’s Museum of Long Island Natural Sciences. Her work has been published in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, the New York Times,  the Lancet, Smithsonian, among others. E.J’s website is http://www.ejwagnercrimehistorian.com

The Press Questions the Occupant

December 2, 2016

“The Press, Watson, is a most valuable institution, if you only know how to use it.”…Sherlock Holmes

 

Q.: Mr. Soon to be Occupant,would you discuss your choice of Attila the Hun as an advisor?

A. “ he is a loyal supporter and a man who knows how to break down barriers. The millions of people who have dealt with him know that.
Many people are saying that. Many people. Except for the millions who voted illegally. And the atheists.”

Q There is a groundswell of disappointment that you rejected Joan of Arc as ethics advisor-how do you respond?

A.“Joanie? First of all, she’s never been a ten-more like a four-and that’s if I’m being generous. Did you see those clothes?
And always playing the woman’s card. That thing with the voices was ok-I get that-but -she had no stamina. A real loser- she goes into court and didn’t even sue anyone. And then she got burned-
Well I like people who don’t get burned. “

Q
Is it true that Torquemada, the former Grand Inquisitor, is under consideration for a cabinet post?

A. It’s between him, the Naked Cowboy, and Giuliani. I’m gonna keep you in suspense on that-
if the lying media don’t like it-they can kiss my tweet

As always-Pursuing Verity EJ Wagner

PursuingVerity05

The Creeping Man

November 9, 2016

I feel debased
I feel disgraced
as we enable
one I’d refuse
my dinner table
I’m sick to find Americans can
manage to choose
The Creeping Man…

( For those not Sherlockians, The Creeping Man is a Holmes tale about an aging chap with a yen for young women. He turns to monkey glands to improve his vigor, with disastrous results… )